Doctors Share Their Worst “Patients Saw On The Internet” Stories

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The internet gives us access to a wealth of information, helps us keep in touch with friends and family, and provides entertainment in a myriad of ways. However, when it comes to our health, the internet is a risky place.

Sure, the internet offers tons of accurate and even life-saving information, But when sifting through at all this information, it’s easy to misdiagnose yourself (especially if you’re not a health professional) or find some very wacky–and dangerous–remedies for things.

In the following stories, doctors share some of the craziest things their patients have learned on the internet. One woman thought eating dirt would cure her ailment. Another woman thought she had testicular cancer. One man went to the ER for a pimple.

Read on for 40 stories about patients misdiagnosing themselves!

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40. Breaking Bad

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My sister is a paramedic. One day she and a team are sent to house. A man had called about a broken arm. I don’t know how he broke his arm the first time, but he had read somewhere on the internet that if he just kept breaking his arm than the pain would go away. He had tried around three times by jumping up and smashing down his weight on his arm, and it shocked everyone that he proceeded after the first time.

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In the end, the guy had to get four surgeries on his arm, but my sister isn’t sure if it wasn’t eventually amputated or not, since she was pretty sure by the look of it and the X-rays that it would have to be.

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39. More Like A Death Juice

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I did home health care and took care of a lovely lady in her nineties. Now, in my experience, when there is a daughter who has looked things up online, you had better look out. This woman had very bad diabetes and even though she was constantly monitored and checking in with her doc multiple times a week, it still was not unusual for her to run between 250-300 after dinner, a carefully measured and balanced dinner. It freaked me out every time I saw it. Anyway, her daughter kept telling me about this juice cleanse she heard about. I kept telling her that it was a really, really bad idea, but she kept bringing it up because her chiropractor talked about it all the time.

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I went on vacation for a week, came back and my lady is gone. Hospitalized. You guessed it, as soon as I was out the door, her daughter started the juice cleanse. She was going to prove me wrong. Amazingly, this little tiny 97-year-old lady managed to do well enough for 3 days. Three days until the evening nurse clocked her blood sugar at over 700!!! The EMTs couldn’t believe it. She was groggy and nauseated, but still conscious and her sweet self. She was in the hospital for over two weeks because they just couldn’t get her sugars to balance. She came home, but had even more problems than before. Her daughter wouldn’t even look at me. She nearly killed her mom to prove herself right.

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38. Feed Your Kid Right

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I had a woman who consulted to the children ER because her daughter had small stomach pain so she ran to a hospital where they passed different blood tests all coming out normal but the mother somehow checked online for Leukemia and she swore her daughter had it despite being perfectly fine. She went, “Well I read online this is how a blood test of a leukemia patient looks like so …”

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The pediatrician who was in for the night had to deal with her all night long until she convinced her the little girl was perfectly healthy and the stomach pain was because she hadn’t eaten in a day. The poor girl spent a whole day at two different hospitals thanks to her mother.

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37. Bleaching The Problem

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I had a patient come into the ER because she saw online that you could remove mouth ulcers by putting bleach in her mouth and rubbing rapidly with a toothbrush.

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The amount of blood coming out of her mouth was insane, I had to use a vinegar solution to neutralize the bleach and stop it from destroying her mouth. I don’t know what happened after that but hopefully, she won’t take any more advice from the internet anymore.

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36. Reese’s Pieces Stops The Seizies

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I’m an RN in pediatric neurology. We frequently have families who refuse to put their kids on seizure medications regardless of the EEG findings and the fact that they, you know, have seizures and stuff.  One family “did the research” and attempted to cure the child’s epilepsy with essential oils, over the counter CBD oil, yoga, metal ion wristbands (to “balance” the brain). They even went as far as having the kid’s dental fillings removed and replaced with a non-metallic filling.

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There was the time that someone told us she didn’t need medication because if you opened a fizzy can of Pepsi and put it under her nose she would come out of a seizure. If that didn’t work, you could whisper “Reese’s Pieces” in her ear and she would stop seizing. My least favorite visits are from parents who refuse to believe that their kid is twitching because they have motor tics and likely Tourette’s instead of epilepsy. Like, if it was a choice between Tourette’s and epilepsy, you should choose Tourette’s all day long. Why these parents are hell bent on giving their kids a diagnosis of epilepsy is beyond me. I just don’t even know anymore.

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35. A Not-So-Good Show

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Veterinarian here. This is the worst I ever had, but not because they were wrong. A large lady wearing a muumuu brings a kitten into the clinic. She plops the kitten onto the examination table and says, “Pretty sure it’s got ringworm.” I examine the kitten, and sure enough, it has a couple of classical ringworm lesions. Too young to give oral antifungals to, so I prescribe a topical therapy for it.

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The large woman then asks if that would work on human skin too. I say it should. She says good, because the reason she knew the kitten had ringworm was because she found a lesion on her own body that she looked up on Google, and it looked like ringworm. And before I can ask anything further, she flops out one large, saggy and obviously non-brassiere-supported boob through the neck of the muumuu to show me the ringworm lesion on the top of her left boob. Yes, that’s a ringworm lesion on your pendulous breast. Now please put it away.

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34. What Did You Say Doc?

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Not A doctor, but my friend is the patient, and this will make my friend sound stupid when she really isn’t. When she had her first baby and was in that woozy/sleepless/new mom phase, she took the baby for her checkup and completely misheard when the doctor told her the baby had eczema.

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She got home and started Googling what she thought he had said, and called me in a panic, saying, “The doctor said the baby has emphysema!” I was like why?? That infant never smoked a day in her life …

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33. Don’t Worry, It’s “Organic”

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Not a doctor, but I worked a death scene where a woman was using black salve to treat her skin cancer. Half her face was gone. Her daughter explained that the doctor told her he could remove all of it and gave a really good prognosis, but she was on board the internet’s bandwagon and she applied this horribly corrosive crap that doesn’t work until the day she died of cancer.

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You could see her teeth through the hole in her cheek. Her computer was still pulled up to the FB boards where people were telling her “It’s doing exactly what it’s supposed to; just keep to the protocol.” It was horrifying.

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32. Do Not Try This At Home

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My friend works as an A&E nurse and she loves telling stories of things she has had to help remove from various places but the one I remember most is this. Before I tell the story. DO NOT TRY THIS AT HOME!!! One day, two men walk into the A&E department one of whom has a light bulb in his mouth. The story unfolds that they read somewhere on the internet that it is possible to put a light bulb in your mouth but once in there because of its shape it is impossible to take out again and he didn’t think this could possibly be true and decided to test it, well guess what? It is true. So they took him off so that they could get the light bulb out and sent him on his way all in all fine just a little embarrassed. That is not the best part.

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Four hours later on that same day, another man comes into the A&E department also with a light bulb in his mouth which he had successfully inserted but was unable to remove; thinking this was a very strange coincidence, questions ensued. Turns out the two boys from before had to get a taxi to and from the hospital the second man was the taxi driver who heard about the day’s events from the two boys as he was driving them home, didn’t believe it was true and decided to try it for himself when he got home.

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31. “I Know Better Than You” Kind Of People

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A patient came in with a rash around her mouth; she was going on about how she had it 14 years ago, and the dermatologist prescribed a certain antibiotic to cure it and diagnosed her with “perioral dermatitis.” She’s showing us pictures on Google. OK. The doctor diagnoses her with impetigo and prescribes her an antibiotic ointment. She leaves and fills the prescription and comes back flipping her lid. She googled impetigo and, with the help of WebMD, came to the conclusion that it was a children’s disorder on the arms and legs that can only be contracted from children and she wasn’t around children. She insists that perioral dermatitis is a “woman’s disorder” and she doesn’t have this “children’s disease.” She says that the antibiotic he prescribed isn’t on the list of treatments. The whole time, she’s showing us these pics off google of “perioral dermatitis” saying it’s a woman’s disorder, but half the pictures were of men.

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Now one thing you should know, perioral dermatitis means rash around the mouth. That’s it. It doesn’t mean anything else. It’s not a type of rash. It’s not only cured by a specific antibiotic. It’s just a rash that happens to be around the mouth. She was furious, shaking with rage and about to start throwing stuff because the doctor wouldn’t prescribe her this certain antibiotic. The doctor told us to call the cops if she came back. People can be over the top.

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30. Explain It Then

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I’m a nurse and my favorite was when a patient’s family member rudely insisted we give her mother who had a major stroke (resulting in nearly zero swallowing capability) as much water as she could drink.

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Why? because “I read a study online that said you can’t aspirate on water because your lungs just absorb it back into your bloodstream.” I looked her dead in the eyes and said: “OK, then explain drowning to me.”

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29. Then Stop Moving Your Mouth

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I’m a dentist and I once had a patient come into my office, absolutely certain he only had gingivitis and needed a normal cleaning. All because he had googled his symptoms and believed he could get a normal clean and go back home and do oil pulling after, which would somehow miraculously heal his gums. He would not allow me to take X-rays or deep clean his teeth, which he needed because plaque was formed well below his gums. He even told me his gums were bleeding from just smiling, moving his mouth, etc. He insisted on just a regular clean and then accused me of trying to make money off him when I basically put my foot down and said I wouldn’t be working on his mouth unless he allowed me to do my job properly.

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I was glad when he decided to walk out and never come back! A lot of people that I see with advanced mouth-related health issues have a phobia of seeing dentists–some are afraid of the pain, some are afraid of being humiliated and some are just not able to afford treatment. That’s why most people let it go so long before they seek help. Of course, some may just not believe in traditional dentistry, but I don’t really encounter them because they tend to “self-treat” or go to holistic dentists.

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28. Nana’s Kind Of Juice

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I’m not a doctor, but I did take my very elderly Nana to the hospital after I showed up to her house and found her slurring her words and behaving very strangely overall. Now, my Nana is a major hypochondriac and when she was admitted, the first thing she told the doctor is that she believed she was experiencing the beginning signs of Parkinson’s.

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It turned out that she had mixed up a bottle of sparkling grape juice with a bottle of regular vino, had drank the entire bottle, and was completely hammered.

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27. Just Sweet Potatoes

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So does Pinterest count too? I had an odd experience recently. I’m a recovery room nurse and while discharging a patient, her daughter told me this: “All diseases and medical conditions can be cured by eating specific foods. I have done my research. There is a lot of information on Facebook and Pinterest. My mother shouldn’t be here–she just needs to eat more sweet potato.”

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For context, the patient had a double mastectomy and lymph nodes removed where unfortunately the cancer had spread.

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26. Alcohol For Babies?

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I’m a doctor of pharmacy and sometimes it can confuse people that may think I’m a medical doctor. Anyway, this story happened a few weeks ago. I had an OB nurse call me to talk to a family about vitamin K shots. These are given to newborns to prevent hemorrhages and excess bleeding.

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Now there is some controversy regarding the practice of giving vitamin K and is kinda similar to the anti-vax movement. That’s not why the parents were concerned; they read online the shot contains benzyl alcohol. Benzyl alcohol is not uncommon to have in some injections because it inhibits microbial growth to keep it sterile. It is very dangerous for newborns, and is never in injections meant for them. The parents didn’t know that part. They were upset because they thought that alcohol is equivalent to giving the baby a drink. The parents were in their 40s.

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25. It Can’t Be Mono!

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I had a 19-year-old girl come in asking for anti-fungal medication because she was convinced she had thrush. Now, if a patient volunteers that they were looking up their symptoms online, I’ll always ask them what they think they have and why. This can sometimes give insight to symptoms or concerns they may not have let on about that help me to make a correct diagnosis. Besides, taking an active role in your health is certainly not a bad thing. As long as you’re not being a know-it-all and acting as if I’m some moron, I welcome that kind of discussion.

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This girl and her boyfriend, though, had googled her symptoms, and at 19 you’re never wrong. When I suggested that perhaps we check an EBV antibody to rule out mono, she looked at me like I was actively drooling on myself and refused, because there was, “No way I can have mono.” Eventually, I convinced her to have some diagnostic testing done, and sure enough, she had mono. I tried to explain that having thrush as a 19-year-old could possibly be much more concerning than mononucleosis, but she didn’t seem to get it.

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24. “This Is What I Have”

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I had a patient come in with several pages he printed off the internet. He kinda slammed them down and said, “This is what I have.” The symptoms included bloating, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, bloody stool, and fever among other things. He insisted he had Schistosomiasis. He was being a real jerk about it like we’re wasting time since he already knew what he had. So I asked when did he get back from Africa. And he said, “Africa? I’ve never been to Africa. What would I be doing in Africa?”

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I proceeded to tell him that Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease one gets while swimming in the Nile River or other rivers in developing countries like in Southeast Asia. He got mad at me because he thought I was mocking him. He was seen and diagnosed with gastroenteritis (the stomach flu). The bloody stool? He had hemorrhoids.

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23. That Shut Him Up

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There was a patient with tonsillitis who came in and was hell bent on his diagnosis of epiglottitis. He was arguing and complaining that we were not listening to his WebMD diagnosis.

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Anyway, the nurse gets fed up and finally screams, “If you had epiglottitis, you would not be freaking speaking to us.” He shut up and took the antibiotics without question.

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22. Google > Doctor

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I’ve worked in a pharmacy on and off for the last ten years so I’ve heard quite a few doctors’ stories about patients. One I recall is about a patient who was suffering from severe migraines and was adamant they had a blood clot in the brain.

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Quite an assumption to make, the doctor assured them it wasn’t anything so sinister and was most likely sinusitis. Of course, the patient didn’t believe him because Google told him otherwise so he decides to go private and spend close to $500 on tests and private care only to be told you’ve got a sinusitis infection …

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21. 4chan At Its Finest

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I’m a 4th-year med student, so I don’t have the M.D. title yet. But during my Pain Management rotation, I had a patient tell me that he had Hep C. And when I asked how he got it and when he was diagnosed, he told me a doctor on 4chan (a website) diagnosed him a few months back after his friend told him he got cancer from too much internet usage. I kid you not, it took me all the power of God not to bust out laughing. But then he continued to go on how he’s helped his friends out with medical advice though 4chan and how he doesn’t trust WebMD or Google for medical advice. Because they’re owned by “the man” and only good at making people believe they have “hypochondriasis.”

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So long story short, he didn’t get the Oxycodone he was hoping to get from this consultation and made a giant fuss how we’re only making his Hep C worse by not giving him medicines.

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20. Ohhhhh

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I had a woman come to see me because of abdominal pain. I spent a good 10 to 15 minutes asking her questions to get a better understanding of what could be happening. I ended up ordering an ultrasound to assess for an ovarian cyst and some blood work.

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As she’s leaving she goes, “Are you doing lab work for my prostate?” I had to bite my tongue so as not to laugh and said, “No, because you’re not a male and you don’t have one.” She just said “oh” and left.

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19. Because Google Says So

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I work in a doctor’s office as a medical office assistant, specifically pediatrics. A secretary buzzes back to me that there’s a call on line two that needs medical advice. I pick it up, and the mother of one of our patients is on the phone having a panic attack. She is hyperventilating into the phone. I asked her if she was alright, thinking maybe she needed an ambulance, and through her breaths and now tears, she starts telling me that she thinks her four-year-old son has a skull fracture. I ask if he fell. No. I ask if he’s conscious. Yes. I ask if he’s breathing. Yes. I ask if he is bleeding from his ears, eyes, nose, mouth, scalp. No. I ask if there is any visible wound. No. I ask why she thinks he fractured his skull. Because underneath his eyes is red and puffy and Google says that’s a skull fracture. I tell her to go to the ER for proper assessment. She doesn’t want to. She says she was supposed to take her kids to the beach. Mind you she is still crying and breathing heavily at this point. I tell her to come right over then but warn her we will probably have to send her to the ER.

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She shows up 15 minutes later, cradling the child and crying. The little boy was crying too and screaming “I don’t want to die, Mommy!” She keeps hushing him and saying “Mommy loves her strong boy, no matter what!” Which only made him cry harder. I pull her back into the room, and she just dissolves as she tells me how she looked at him in horror this morning and saw the guarantee signs of a skull fracture. She swears he must have hit his head yesterday at swim practice. The little boy is crying hard, but I can see the noticeable swelling and pinkness under the eyes that she was referring too. I went to get the doctor and told her what I thought. She went in and came out about ten minutes later shaking her head. She had the same diagnosis. You know when you wipe your eyes after swimming, you usually wipe under your eye too? The kid must have wiped off his sunscreen around his eyes the day before. All the pinkness and puffiness was from a mild sunburn under his eyes.

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18. Dirt For The Bacteria

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Doctor here. One story that sticks out is a woman who was convinced that she had Helicobacter pylori (bacteria that cause stomach ulcers in some) and had to be tested. I reviewed her chart and it showed multiple negative tests over the years and even a biopsy sample from an upper GI scope that was negative.

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Her treatment for this “infection” was to eat dirt. Literally dirt from the Internet advertised to cure stomach issues. There was no convincing her that this wasn’t a thing. This is a tame one, but the others are too specific to tell without the possibility of revealing the patient’s identity.

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17. This Is So Sad

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A lady on four vasopressors, including high dose epinephrine, was gonna die in the next few hours. The husband was convinced that epinephrine was causing the low blood pressure and low heart rate. He kept going back and forth from home to the hospital with online printouts despite myself, my fellow, and my attending, and the nurses all telling him that this medication is keeping her alive. We looked at his first printout, it said, “ephedrine” we’re like uhhh first of all, that’s not the same medication.

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Anyways, I actually tell him that if I were him, I’d stay with her and that she may only have minutes left. He’s threatening to sue us and he’s convinced he’s right, he goes home again to get a new print out, and she ends up dying while he’s at home.

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16. She Threw A Fit

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I had a patient come into the clinic who insisted she had radiculopathy because her feet were numb and painful, and she wanted a surgical evaluation. I asked her why she felt that way. The only thing she could say was she looked it up on the internet.

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She was very aggressive about it, saying she needed an MRI and she was mad that her PCP didn’t order one. I explained to her what diabetic neuropathy was, and she insisted it wasn’t that. I told her that the fact that she had diabetes, the stocking glove pattern, and the fact that at least two doctors at her PCP office said this was diabetic neuropathy meant she didn’t need a further workup for back surgery. She threw a fit.

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15. Just Pop It!

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I had some guy come in the ER in the middle of the night because he had a pimple on his forehead; he had been prodding at it non-stop, so of course, the thing turned reddish.

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He just sat there terrified, explaining that “I was on the internet, and I have no idea why, but then I googled “head cancer” and saw pictures and they were horrible and I went, that’s it, I’m going to the ER!” Final prescription: Do not go to the internet for symptoms, and stop waking me up because you’ve got a pimple, please.

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14. There’s No Medicine For Denial

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Nobody really wants to be responsible for their obesity. So people google diseases that could be causing them to gain weight. My favorite was a lady who insisted that she had Cushing’s Disease (what people mean when they say have a “glandular” issue). It was obvious that she didn’t. It’s rare and there are some classic signs that normal obese people don’t have.

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So I went through an exercise where we discuss all the food that she ate during a typical day. We hit roughly 3,000 calories before finishing what she typically eats for lunch. The conversation never goes well from there. There is nothing that I can prescribe for denial.

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13. “I Think I Caught Down Syndrome Guys!”

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Serious answer: I try to ask my patients if they have googled their symptoms. It gives me a lot of information about what they are worried about. I then try to stay humble about their findings, and try to not be a jerk about that. Trust is not built by telling people they are stupid.

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However, it is hard to keep a straight face when a 50-year old male walks in and says “I think I have caught the Down’s syndrome,” or when a young woman thought she had testicular cancer.

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12. This Is Why Education Is Important

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In this day and age of the internet, I’m still surprised people don’t use WebMD more. Just this week I was in our workroom when a senior physician sitting next to me was on the phone and suddenly grabbed my arm while desperately trying to keep a straight face.

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The senior physician was talking to a 24-year-old female patient and the conversation was going: “No ma’am … You can get absolutely get pregnant even if you don’t climax … No ma’am, just because he’s feeling nauseated the morning after doesn’t mean you’re pregnant …” I mean the Web MD page on this is pretty darn good …

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11. Stop Grinding

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Not a doctor, but a dentist. I had a 20-year-old patient come in complaining of jaw pain and thinking he was having a heart attack (because he googled you can get referred pain in the jaw whilst having one). Not realizing that his “heart attack” was taking a very long time to you know, actually attack.

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Turns out his temporomandibular joint was aching because he was grinding his teeth at night. I had to spend 20 minutes reassuring him that he wasn’t going to die just yet.

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10. A Coke Solution

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I’m a nursing student. One of my professors told me about a patient she had who was in her early 20s with her third unintended pregnancy. They asked her what she was doing for birth control, to which she replied that she “had it covered.”

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Upon further investigation, she revealed that she knew the little swimmers cannot survive in an acidic environment (which is true, to an extent) and that Coca-Cola is acidic (also true). So after having sex, she would simply pour a can of Coke into her lady bits–problem solved! There was extensive education done after that …

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9. Stomach Pain + Vomiting = Pregnant

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I once had a woman come in who was convinced she was pregnant. I, of course, heard her out, but one tiny part of her story made me question it a little. She mentioned that she had not had intercourse for over a year.

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What’s worse is, she was not basing this off a pregnancy test, she merely looked up vomiting and stomach pain on WebMD. Naturally, I told her to do a test and then come back to me. She never did.

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8. Cheapest Way To Cure Cancer?

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I’m not a doctor but I have a good story. My parents are long divorced and don’t speak. My grandma on my mom’s side was dying of cancer and my dad casually expressed his condolences and said: “I told your sister how to get rid of it but I guess she didn’t pass it on.”

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I was only paying half attention when he said it and I did a double take like: “What the heck are you talking about?” He explained that he’d been doing internet research and saw a bunch of stories about baking soda curing cancer. Blew my mind.

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7. Are You Even Serious?

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My sister is a doctor. A patient shows up with severe cold-like symptoms, doctor suspects para-influenza (para-flu for short), tests run, and sister calls patient 24 hours later confirming para-flu over the phone advising “It’s no big deal, you’ll get better, fluids, rest, etc.” to which the patient responds, “I looked that up on the internet and I don’t think you are treating me seriously; most people get pneumonia and need antibiotics.”

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For those who know what para-flu is, you will know that it’s viral and therefore antibiotics would be 100% useless but she went ahead and humored the patient and asked what else they found online. The response was “parrot flu is caused by some kinda chlamydia, like an STD.” Turns out Psittacosis is carried by parrots and can infect humans.

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6. It’s A Delusion

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I was working with a physician and we went to see a patient who insisted that he had tiny fibers and worms/bugs coming out from his skin. He had extensively googled his symptoms, self-diagnosed with Morgellons disease, and had even gone as far as to join a support group.

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He was extremely articulate and intelligent, but when confronted with the fact that Morgellon’s disease is delusional parasitosis, he acknowledged this but couldn’t grasp that a delusion would mean that he is perceiving something that is not actually there (delusion = fixed, false belief).

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5. Self-Medicating Is Never Okay

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I’m not a doctor but my friend in college noticed she had some white stuff on her tongue, so she WebMD’d it, decided she had thrush, then gargled straight vinegar to get rid of it, telling us that she used it 30 seconds longer than recommended to make sure the thresh died.

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She goes to the doctor later and finds out that it wasn’t thrush; it was just the way her tongue was. There was nothing wrong. Except the vinegar wash killed the protective coating on her tongue, so now she can’t eat anything acidic. Even a single walnut is too much pain. She screwed up her tongue forever.

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4. Two Decades Of Diagnosis Errors

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One time I accompanied my wife to the doctor’s office. She had looked up her symptoms on the internet and diagnosed her calf pain, a strained muscle in hindsight, as peripheral artery disease. The doctor was not in the least sympathetic or tactful in explaining that PAD doesn’t appear suddenly during an exercise session.

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She felt humiliated, and immediately changed to a more sympathetic doctor. Twenty years on, the self-diagnosis errors continue.

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3. Google Won’t Save Your Pet

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Veterinary Technician here. A guy brought his beautiful 3-year-old spaniel in because he saw “tapeworms all over his rear end.” The dog comes in severely lethargic and with a diaper on (the dog also had severe diarrhea). When I pulled back the diaper … maggots. Everywhere. He said he googled a picture of tapeworms and that’s what it looked like. Uh, no. The dog apparently had a small wound near his rear that got infested with maggots and by putting the diaper on, it only exacerbated the problem.

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The dog ended up dying later that evening after we spent hours removing the maggots, shaving hair, and administering every medication we could. We told the guy next time to not google things and bring in his pets immediately if there is ever anything that seems off. I think he learned his lesson.

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2. It’s Not Just For You

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I’m a nurse. I have a lot of WebMD stories, but my favorite is the 57-year-old woman who came in for a routine visit and a request to try a new medication that she saw advertised on TV. Her visit was for a complaint of increasing urinary retention over the past three weeks. Most urinary retention in women is due to a mild bladder infection … very common in women that age.

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When we asked her about the medication she wanted to try, she said the TV ad said it was for urinary retention, so we listened. She took out a scrap of paper with the name of the medication scribbled on it: Flomax. Well. That’s not what’ll work for her and the doctor quickly said he could not prescribe it for her. She was a little offended at the refusal and asked why not. The doctor said, “Flomax is for benign prostatic hypertrophy and you don’t need it.” She demanded an explanation. The doctor bluntly explained, “This is treating an enlarged prostate. Women don’t have prostates.”

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1. She’s An Anti-Vaxxer

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My mom is really bad about thinking that her internet research is right and the doctors don’t know anything. She’s an anti-vaxxer. She’s also slightly mentally ill. I’m so lucky I grew up with both my parents, even divorced, because my dad was sane. My mom has had a lifelong paranoia of doctors stemming from her childhood, and when she caught wind of the theory that vaccines cause autism, she started blaming every health issue ever on them and justified her own paranoia. Her poor dog, my childhood dog, got a nasty tumor last year.

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She had a lady she worked with who was a vet biopsy but refused treatment when it came back as cancerous. The dog is still alive and seems to be doing fine almost six months later, so I guess it might be okay because she doesn’t seem to be in any pain. But the poor pup hasn’t gone to a vet in the 11 years we’ve had her. I’m surprised she’s still okay. There’s so much to unpack with my mom but I’m pretty scared that one day someone will find her dead because she had some untreated illness. I love her and don’t want to lose her because of this.

Marijean Grace

Marijean Grace

Spreading some good positive vibes!

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