<img src="https://trc.taboola.com/1185750/log/3/unip?en=page_view" width="0" height="0" style="display:none">

Hilariously Terrible Yelp Reviews of Iconic U.S. Attractions

Next
Shutterstock

The most revered U.S. attractions, like the Statue of Liberty or the White House, may impress droves of visitors every year, but not everyone is a fan of these famous sites.

Yelp reviewers do not hold back, even when talking about these popular attractions. Read on to see what they find unacceptable about these renowned spots. Though there are some valid criticisms, all of these negative reviews have a hilarious twist.

Advertisement

The Lincoln Memorial – Washington, D.C.

“Extremely disappointing. I recently went to the Memorial and Lincoln did not speak to me. Heck, he didn’t even get up to greet me at the entrance. He just sat there stone faced in silence. I even asked about his experiences in slaying vampires and no response. How rude! Would not recommend it unless you wanted to see a statue.” – Nick B.

Shutterstock

Don’t let the movies fool you, the statue in this memorial is neither alive nor a vampire slayer. It was sculpted by Daniel Chester French and carved by the Piccirilli Brothers to honor US President Abraham Lincoln. The colossal seated figure of Lincoln was unveiled in 1922.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Cloud Gate – Chicago

“This is just a mirror! Like why u gotta reflect everything. Lowkey lots of fingerprint smudges. Also saw myself in the cloud gate and I was looking pudgy so the mirror ain’t even [anything]. I wish I could negative rate but it’s not even an option here. Don’t waste your time.” – Justin L.

Shutterstock

Cloud Gate is actually a public sculpture by Indian-born British artist Sir Anish Kapoor. Of course, people can’t help but touch it, so fingerprint smudges are inevitable. It is the centerpiece of AT&T Plaza at Millennium Park in the Loop community area of Chicago, Illinois.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Times Square – New York City

“Lack of decent chain restaurants was disappointing. I mean, how are you going to offer an Olive Garden and Red Lobster but no Logan’s steakhouse. I mean you are only in New York once – I want a steak!!! Am I wrong?” – PS R.

Shutterstock

Brightly lit Times Square is a major commercial intersection, tourist destination, entertainment hub, and neighborhood in the Midtown Manhattan section of New York City, at the junction of Broadway and Seventh Avenue. It stretches from West 42nd to West 47th Streets. You’ll know you’re there when you’re surrounded by numerous billboards and advertisements and pedestrian areas.

Advertisement

Advertisement

San Diego Zoo

“You can’t touch animals. The sharks in with the penguins are the wrong type.” – W W.

Shutterstock

The San Diego Zoo is seen as an urban oasis for all ages. Located in Balboa Park, San Diego, California, it houses more than 3,500 animals of more than 650 species and subspecies. You’ll see habitats for animals such as gorillas, Komodo dragons, tigers, flamingos, mandrills, polar bears, birds of paradise, giant tortoises, elephants, and more. It wouldn’t be wise to try to touch most of these animals, and we’re not sure what the “wrong type” of sharks would be.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Liberty Bell – Philadelphia

“Let me just relay a few of the reasons the Liberty Bell is a national disappointment: Not in a tower. Cannot be rung, AND it’s broken. Disappointing to say the least. It’s not even that big.” – Emily C.

Shutterstock

The Liberty Bell, previously called the State House Bell or Old State House Bell, is an iconic symbol of American independence. On July 8, 1776, the bell was rung to celebrate the first public reading of the Declaration of Independence. It wasn’t called the “Liberty Bell” until the 1830s, when an abolitionist group adopted it as a symbol of their own cause. It’s not clear when the Liberty Bell got its famous crack.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Joshua Tree National Park – California

“Desert, some flowers, some cactuses, some palm trees, but boring. Definitely not worth 30$.” – Genaro G.

Shutterstock

Joshua Tree National Park is a vast protected area in southern California. It features striking rock formations and bare desert landscapes. This famous park is named after the area’s twisted, bristled Joshua trees and it straddles the cactus-studded Colorado Desert and the Mojave Desert, which is higher and cooler. Hiking trails wind through the boulders of Hidden Valley.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Niagara Falls – New York (and Ontario, Canada)

“Lots of water…didn’t get wet as advertised. No barrels, no tightrope, no nothing. I did however get pink eye from the viewfinder… this is not okay.” – Wolf P.

Shutterstock

Niagara Falls is home to one of the world’s most stunning natural wonders. Located in New York State and straddling the Canadian border, it features 3 dramatic waterfalls, the American Falls, the Bridal Veil Falls (named for its resemblance to a bride’s veil) and the largest, the Horseshoe Falls.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Faneuil Hall Marketplace – Boston

“Why are there so many stars???? Uber-touristy. Smells like old grease. You will smell like old grease. I wouldn’t eat here, evah! Oh and to park in the parking structure for one hour… $23!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!” – Cassie P.

Shutterstock

In 1742 Peter Faneuil, Boston’s wealthiest merchant, built Faneuil Hall as a gift to the city. Faneuil Hall Marketplace is actually made up of 4 historic market buildings set around a promenade – Faneuil Hall, Quincy Market, North Market and South Market. In the cobblestone promenade, jugglers, magicians, and musicians entertain the passers-by. For most people, it’s a wonderful place to stroll, shop, eat and explore.

Advertisement

Advertisement

White House – Washington, DC

“I too grew up in a white house…The house I grew up in was white. This was meh. I didn’t get to go inside but I saw it from a distance. Lots of history, if you are into that sort of thing, I guess.” – Ellie E.

Shutterstock

The White House is the official residence and workplace of the president of the United States. It is has been the residence of every U.S. president since John Adams in 1800. The design for the Presidential Mansion (as it was originally called) was decided by a contest, and the winner was James Hoban, a native of Ireland.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Washington Monument – Washington DC

“Well, it really is no big deal. Yes, it is the tallest monument but it just looks like a big pencil. Take it or leave it. It is cool however how it looks in the reflecting pool. Very neat.” – Gina M.

Shutterstock

The Washington Monument is an obelisk, towering above its namesake city. It was built to serve as an awe-inspiring reminder of George Washington, an outstanding figure in American history. He was the commander of the Continental Army in the American Revolutionary War and became the first President of the United States. When completed, the Washington Monument was the tallest building in the world at 555 feet, 5-1/8 inches.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Pier 39 – San Francisco

“This is a fake pier built as an amusement park forty years ago and it is tourist sheep-shearing station. It has nothing to do with the industry of the waterfront, with fishing or for that matter, San Francisco. I grew up nearby.” – Chris D.

Shutterstock

Pier 39 is a shopping center and popular tourist attraction built on a pier. It’s a hive of activity with shops, restaurants, a video arcade, street performances, the Aquarium of the Bay, virtual 3D rides, and sightings of California sea lions from the docks of Pier 39’s marina.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Empire State Building – New York City

“So many lines dude. You get in line to buy a ticket and then wait in line for a metal detector and then wait in line for a phone and then wait in line for an elevator. Not worth it fam. It’s $40 to take a ride to the top of a building. I do not recommend wasting your day waiting in lines.” – Amanda L.

Shutterstock

For many, the Empire State Building is a must-visit attraction. This 102-story Art Deco skyscraper was designed by Shreve, Lamb & Harmon and completed in 1931. The building has a roof height of 1,250 feet and it stands a total of 1,454 feet tall, including its antenna. It was built in just 410 days – using seven million hours of labor during the Great Depression.

Advertisement

Advertisement

French Quarter – New Orleans

“The French Quarter is America’s garbage can and cesspool. It reeks of urine, faeces, vomit… it is filthy. Garbage can lined streets, trash pick up everyday, at anytime. Drunks and vagrants everywhere. Noise, noise, noise. Smokers everywhere.” – Lori R.

Shutterstock

The French Quarter is famous for its vibrant nightlife and colorful buildings with cast-iron balconies. Popular Bourbon Street features jazz clubs, Cajun eateries and bars serving intriguing cocktails. Quieter streets lead to the French Market, with gourmet food and local crafts, and to Jackson Square where street performers entertain in front of St. Louis Cathedral.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Alcatraz Island – San Francisco

“IT STINKS!!! Literally, the whole island smells like bird [droppings]. It’s nauseating. I felt literally sick to my stomach. And it wasn’t even any better inside the buildings. It smelled even worse. I don’t know how, but it was disgusting.” – Diane Z.

Shutterstock

Alcatraz Island is a small island in San Francisco Bay. It is the United States’ most notorious prison. It was developed with facilities for a lighthouse, a military fortification, and a military prison. It has been said to have been used to hold prisoners who continually caused trouble at other federal prisons.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Grand Canyon National Park – Arizona

“Ehh. I’ve seen better. Big woop.” – Barry G.

Shutterstock

One of the world’s natural wonders, the iconic Grand Canyon usually amazes visitors who peek over the edge of its majestic cliffs. The copper-colored Colorado River has carved the rock and given it its unique color. The rock layers reveal billions of years of history and are home to many rare species. A view of the canyon and Colorado River, is known to be spectacular at sunrise and sunset.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Golden Gate Bridge – San Francisco

“This bridge sucks. It looks rusty as [ever]. The fact that it’s a known monument is atrocious. Much to my chagrin it has yet to be torn down and replaced with a bridge suitable enough for a troll like myself to live under.”

Shutterstock

A visit to the world famous Golden Gate Bridge is normally an unforgettable experience. There is something for everyone. You can choose whether you prefer to hike, walk, bike, shop, take a guided tour, or just sit back and take it all in.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Lombard Street – San Francisco

“Yawn.” – Gwynnie P.

Shutterstock

Lombard Street is famous for a steep, one-block section with 8 hairpin turns. Beware of traffic, though, because most of the street’s western segment is a major thoroughfare designated as part of U.S. Route 101.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Central Park – New York City

“Central Park is a disgusting cesspool, with a serious rat problem.” – Alf O.

Shutterstock

Central Park has gained popularity as a welcome, expansive green space in a very busy, built-up city. It may feel slightly surreal to see Manhattan’s impressive skyline peeking over the tops of the trees. And there’s always something happening in this park. From free live theater performances, including the famous Shakespeare in the Park summer tradition, to a zoo and an ice skating rink in the winter.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Walt Disney World – Orlando, Florida

“Walt Disney World has gotten so GREEDY. They care more about making money rather than accommodating for a pleasant visit and preserving Walt Disney’s signature hospitality. Now you just feel like one of a million suckers.” – Lori C.

Getty Images

The magic of Walt Disney World has captured the imaginations of millions of visitors for generations and the fascination doesn’t seem to be ending any time soon. Its four theme parks, Epcot, Magic Kingdom Park, Disney’s Animal Kingdom Park and Disney’s Hollywood Studios feature nearly 60,000 cast members performing in more than 3,000 different roles.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Santa Monica Pier – California

“Gimmicky unhealthy are the words that come to mind when you walk along the Santa Monica Pier. This spot takes forever to drive down to since the traffic is pretty gnarly on The Last Mile to the beach where the pier entrance is.” – Moses H.

Shutterstock

The Santa Monica Pier is a large double-jointed pier at the foot of Colorado Avenue. It has a laid-back beach town atmosphere with its small amusement park, concession stands, look-out points, and fishing areas. Still, its 8 neighborhoods offer a sophisticated a mix of shopping, dining, entertainment, and outdoor recreation.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Hollywood Sign – Los Angeles

“Heard this place was haunted so I had to check it out up close and personal. When I arrived at the lookout point where consumers gather in the day (ugh..) a sudden chill blasted down the rear of my blouse. I quickly spun about to see where it came from (the direction of the Hollywood sign itself) but was over taken with jarring and acute blindness. I fell to my knees and begun weeping in fear. I felt lizards run up and down my pant leg. I was being possessed. Anyways, long story short, I’m all good now and can safely say I did not enjoy my experience there.” – Walter T.

Shutterstock

The Hollywood Sign is an iconic landmark overlooking Hollywood. It sits on Mount Lee, in the Hollywood Hills area of the Santa Monica Mountains. The sign is 350 feet long and “HOLLYWOOD” is spelled out in 45-foot-tall white capital letters. It is a popular tourist attraction because it has been frequently seen in films and TV series.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Hoover Dam – Nevada

“WORST HOOVER DAM EXPERIENCE – AKA, DAM DERANGEMENT SYNDROME (or DDS). This was a seriously degraded experience from my visit in 2009. HD is a failing attraction, now one of the most overpriced, disorganized tourist traps I’ve ever experienced.” – GardenInTheGrove N.

Shutterstock

Hoover Dam is a concrete arch-gravity dam in the Black Canyon of the Colorado River, on the border between Nevada and Arizona. This National Historic Landmark stands at more than 725 feet above the Colorado River and was constructed between 1931 and 1936 during the Great Depression. It may not be the prettiest attraction but it is the highest concrete dam in the Western Hemisphere.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Fisherman’s Wharf – San Francisco

“I have traveled throughout the world and this area has literally the most disgusting public restrooms I have ever had the displeasure to visit. I didn’t want to let my kids in there it was so disgusting.” – Cybelle M.

Shutterstock

Fisherman’s Wharf is one of San Francisco’s busiest tourist areas. It’s understandable when you consider the scenic views of the bay, Golden Gate Bridge and Alcatraz. You’ll find an abundance of souvenir shops and stalls selling crab and clam chowder in sourdough bread bowls. You can also see a colony of sea lions or tour historic ships. At Ghirardelli Square, the famous former chocolate factory now houses boutiques and eateries.

Advertisement

Advertisement

South Beach – Miami

“Nice beach, full of AWFUL, HORRENDOUS, VAPID people, constantly on their phone and dumb people everywhere. Go north if the people and noise bother you as well.” – Owen R.

Shutterstock

South Beach is known as the glamorous see-and-be-seen part of Miami. With its beautiful beaches, hot-ticket nightspots and celebrity-chef eateries, it’s famous for being a happening place. Ocean Drive is known for its well-preserved art deco architecture and there are lots of outdoor cafes to choose from, great for people watching!

Advertisement

Advertisement

Space Needle – Seattle

“I paid 80 dollars to ride in an elevator, get yelled at for reading the information on the wall in line, watch kids lick the glass walls, and smell everyone’s B.O. on the elevator ride down because they crammed everyone like sardines. Bye.” – Jetta B.

Shutterstock

This observation tower is an iconic city landmark. It was built in the Seattle Center for the 1962 World’s Fair, under the theme “The Age of Space.” One of the most photographed structures in the world, the Space Needle continues to symbolize the innovative and forward-thinking spirit of Seattle.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Hollywood Walk of Fame – Los Angeles

“Spider-Man was touchy and rude. Don’t give him the time of day. He’s impulsive and doesn’t take no for an answer so don’t make eye contact with him. The whole place smells like straight up weed and smelled like urine too. Not what I expected.” – Jose A.

Shutterstock

The Hollywood Walk of Fame features over 2,600 terrazzo and brass stars embedded in the sidewalks to honor acclaimed personalities from motion pictures, television, radio, live theatre, and recording from 1960 to today. The names on the stars belong to a mix of musicians, actors, directors, producers, musical and theatrical groups, fictional characters, and others.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Gateway Arch – St. Louis

“The city of Saint Louis is the worst city that I have visited in the United States and I have visited 49 of the 50 states!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! DO NOT GO TO THIS CITY!” – Dale W.

Shutterstock

There are many who are equally passionate about the majestic views and fascinating stories you get while on a tram going up this arch. This iconic monument takes its name from the city’s role as the “Gateway to the West” during the westward expansion of the United States in the 19th century.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Mount Rushmore – Keystone, South Dakota

“World’s most mysterious natural rock formation Mountainous Rushmore was underwhelming and a lot smaller than promised, not even sure who all those men are up there but I think it’s just the same man four times in a row and why is that???? There should be four or five WOMEN up there if you ask me.” – Drew C.

Shutterstock

Mount Rushmore National Memorial is a massive sculpture carved into Mount Rushmore, and it brings American history to life…in stone. The sculpture’s roughly 60-ft.-high granite faces depict U.S. presidents George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, and Abraham Lincoln. The site also features a museum with interactive exhibits.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Statue of Liberty – New York City

“I wouldn’t wish this experience on my worst enemy. Imagine a combination of prison and the worst airport security. You won’t get close to the horrors our (yes I am a US taxpayer) Park Service has created.” – J H.

Shutterstock

Guarding the entrance to New York Harbor on Liberty Island, the 305-foot (93-meter) Statue of Liberty was a gift from France to the United States to commemorate the 100-year anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence. Lady Liberty has been a symbol of democracy and hope for New York City and the US since 1886. Together with neighboring Ellis Island, the Statue of Liberty National Monument is administered by the National Park Service. It’s true, you have to clear heavy security before you get onto Liberty Island.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Pike Place Market – Seattle

“If you like standing in line for three hours to get a coffee this place is for you!” – Brock S.

Shutterstock

This beloved public market overlooks the Elliott Bay waterfront. The Market opened August 17, 1907, and is one of the oldest continuously operated public farmers’ markets in the United States. It is a vibrant community of farmers, craftspeople, small businesses and residents.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Disneyland – Anaheim, California

“What the hell Disneyland, if you want to make EVERYONE comfortable and happy that should include smokers. Not having even one single smoking area is seriously wrong. I come here multiple times a year I won’t be anymore. Today has been the worst experience I’ve ever had here and it’s the least busy day I’ve ever come.” – Emily K.

Pinterest | Disney

The expansive Disneyland Resort is divided up into themed “lands” with related rides, shows, and attractions. Since 1955, it has been in the business of make-believe. It is made up of the original Disneyland Park and the adjacent Disney California Adventure Park.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Venice Beach – Los Angeles

“This place is DISGUSTING!!!!!! I don’t know when these 4 star reviews went to this dump. It should be closed down.” – Deborah M.

Shutterstock

Venice’s bohemian spirit may not be for everyone, but for those who like a vibrant beach town with upscale commercial and residential pockets, this is the place for you. On Venice Boardwalk, you’ll find funky shops, street performers and colorful murals. For the free-spirited, there’s a skate park and Muscle Beach outdoor gym. Meanwhile, foodies and the style-savvy will love Abbot Kinney Boulevard.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Kennedy Space Center – Merritt Island, Florida

“Tourist trap. Long drive, tolls, boring. Expensive food and admission. Long wait for unimpressive tour and videos. Save your money and watch a documentary. If you or your kids are space nerds, you might get something out of it. Go rent and bike or a kayak.” – Nunya B.

Shutterstock

This is the place where “space nerds” can get up close to space shuttle Atlantis, view exhibits, historic spacecraft and memorabilia. Learn more about rocket launches and take bus tours of the spaceport.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Brooklyn Bridge – New York City

“The main stressor in my life. Gridlocked traffic, screaming drivers, buses that emit fouler odors than sewage waste dumps…” – Svetlana K.

Shutterstock

The iconic Brooklyn Bridge was opened in 1883 to carry traffic (non-automotive at the time) between Lower Manhattan and Brooklyn. This highly recognizable structure has been featured in movies and TV shows, and is seen as a piece of New York City history.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Southernmost Point – Key West, Florida

“Major rip off — NOT the Southernmost point in the Continental U.S. (you would need to visit the privately-owned Ballast Key to the southwest of Key West to experience that). And it’s not even a buoy — it’s an old piece of sewer pipe that the city found lying around and tarted up with some lipstick-red paint.” – Peter E.

Shutterstock

This is Key West’s most photographed spot. The buoy almost marks the southernmost point in the continental United States. We say “almost” because the true southernmost point in the country is the privately-owned Ballast Key. Still, the Southernmost Point Buoy is also famous for its proximity to Cuba.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Mall of America – Bloomington, Minnesota

“This place is a raging s***hole! If you like being surrounded by idiots on their phones, be my guest.” – Dave and John W.

Shutterstock

This giant four-level mall boasts hundreds of stores, as well as restaurants, and an aquarium. It is seen as more than a mall. It’s a destination with dozens of fun attractions including a 13-screen movie theater, an indoor theme park, a simulator ride that “soars” over national landmarks, Minnesota’s largest aquarium, arcades, mini-golf and much more.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Road to Hana – Maui

“Road to Hana? More like road to hell. Unless you want to drive for 2.5 plus hours through a rainforest with curvy, narrow roads, and one lane bridges with the same vegetation the whole way then this is not for you. Biggest waste of a day in Maui.” – Andrea S.

Shutterstock

The scenic drive on the Road to Hana is known as the most popular attraction on the island. Along the way you take in lush rainforest, dramatic ocean views, and numerous waterfalls and pools.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Wright Brothers National Memorial – Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina

“What a rip off. First of all, why does the government charge for a national MEMORIAL. It’s not like it’s Yellowstone. It’s a statue. So, for a car of 5, it was $40!!! And the visitor center was closed for remodeling. And not to mention you can see the memorial from the road. TOTAL RIPOFF. Skip it.” – Casi Chilango X.

Shutterstock

Wright Brothers National Memorial commemorates the exact spot where the first successful, sustained flight took place. The flight lasted only 12 seconds, but it laid the groundwork for major advances in flying. That’s no small feat!

Advertisement

Advertisement

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame – Cleveland

“A cacophony of noise and a waste of $26. I can see similar items for free at The Hard Rock Cafe.” – Genevieve A.

Shutterstock

The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame opened in 1995 and celebrated with a blockbuster benefit concert at nearby Cleveland Municipal Stadium. This marathon show featured once-in-a-lifetime pairings and performances by greats such as James Brown, Bob Dylan, Jerry Lee Lewis, Aretha Franklin, Johnny Cash and Booker T. and the M.G.s. In addition to the concert, the Rock Hall’s opening weekend featured a ribbon-cutting ceremony attended by Little Richard and Yoko Ono. Today, it continues to generate lots of interest as a world-class museum.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Balboa Park, San Diego

“For some reason, crossbows are not allowed here or Morley Field, so we had to head home after waking up at 7 am.” – Ryan K.

Shutterstock

Balboa Park is a 1,200-acre urban cultural park with natural vegetation zones, green belts, gardens, and walking paths. It also contains museums, several theaters, and the world-famous San Diego Zoo, offering an experience that combines culture, science, and nature.

Advertisement

Kat Begonja

Kat Begonja

Lover of animals, writing and all things Croatian!

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!